Top hotels in London to Make Your Trip Go from Blah to Fantastic

Top hotels in London to Make Your Trip Go from Blah to Fantastic

Are you planning to visit London but confused about where to stay? Accommodation is an important aspect to be considered when you go for a vacation, so here we are to solve your problem. Let us look at the list of hotels that should be kept in mind when staying in London. Depending on your budget, choice, likes and location, we bring a list of hotels from which you can select the best one to visit.

The Stafford London:



Near Buckingham Palace, in a calm district called St. James, is the hotel that features about 400-year wine cellars and underground tunnels still functional to the St. James's Palace. The Main House, a historic residence of nineteenth-century royalty, features custom made rooms with antique decor and wallpapers. The Carriage Chamber's ground-floor apartments, founded as barracks for the lords' horses, still have stables and are named after renowned horses. (If you prefer something more modern, stay in one of the Mews Suites.) Visit the American Bar to look at autographed celebrity photos and a ceiling covered in bar connections. 

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The Rubens at the Palace:



The hotel, built in the 1800s to accommodate starlets enjoying receptions at the Palace, features marble flooring, crystal hardware, and huge guestrooms packed with valuables and unique paintings. From the time you walk into the Rubens' hallway, you'll be welcomed like a VIP while you observe the national guard troops in the Royal Mews from the hotel's balconies on Buckingham Palace Road. Here you can order the hand-chopped Buccleuch Estate sirloin for supper, then finish with a serving of chocolate dessert.

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The Ritz London:

The Ritz London is an ideal place for a first-time visitor to London: its ambience is quintessentially English, with flowers that get you cosy, whereas the guesthouse is accessible to the must-visit areas of London such as Soho, Piccadilly, and Covent Garden. A luscious three-course Sunday dinner is served at the Ritz, which consists of the Sirloin roast on everyone's London bucket list, a dining room sumptuous enough to have you wonder, and the gorgeous murals and plated sculptures, which makes it a perfect Instagram heaven.

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Dukes London:



The site is Green Park in Mayfair, adjacent to Jermyn St.'s gentlemen's boutiques and is walking distance from Buckingham Palace. The site is known for its royal feel and lovely ambience. The carpentry speaks of its sublimity from the windows frames that are manicured in perfection to the spotless canvases, the undefiled parquet floor. Visiting this hotel is like walking into a PBS miniseries. A guesthouse so extraordinary has been, has been loved by many among the Queen Mother and Princess Diana. While arriving in, go straight to the small Bar for a martini. Ian Fleming's love of the cocktail began here.

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Corinthia London:



This isn't a hotel for the people who are not financially well versed. It's a paradise of glitter and crystals, and it's not the kind of facility that does things half-heartedly—the four-story spa is one of the best in the city. This great site is neighbouring to many famous buildings such as the Houses of Parliament, the south bank, the Thames and last but not least, the famous Trafalgar Square. As you approach the Royal Penthouse, the bedrooms get deluxe with their salon and champagne store and a deck overlooking the London Eye.

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JW Marriott Grosvenor House London:



The old Grosvenor House on Park Lane exudes a cocooning aura of well-trained competence, where even the most minor hiccup is quickly addressed. Only a few relics from its glitzy Jazz Age heyday have survived—most notably, the classic access colonnade that connects two turrets keeping 494 rooms. The expansive rooms and restrooms are modelled for broad appeal, with dotted rugs, thick curtains with swags, and English bath salts for the bathroom sink. Corrigans is a more private dining choice, but save time for the outstanding English tea in the Park Room, which overlooks Hyde Park.

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Kimpton Fitzroy London:



This Bloomsbury landmark house, originally known as the Hotel Russell, is known for its abundant construction by Charles Fitzroy Doll, who built the Titanic's dining area. The hotel was relaunched in 2018 as Britain's first Kimpton. However, it still has almost all of the architectural elements which have made it a favourite for a century. The elements include:

  1. A thé-au-lait clay front
  2. Sculptures of four British Queens guarding the entry
  3. An astrological mural on the lobby flooring

Vibrant cushions by fabric artist Kit Miles portray "Lucky George," a copper monster discovered on the second-floor stairway second, less fortunate version of the same mould was on the Titanic.

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The Lanesborough:



The Lanesborough, on Hyde Park, is an unabashed mix of marble, faux label, and granite with all the inner requirements of grand hotel assistance to suit, thanks to a butler for every suite. A top-to-toe refurbishment has been embraced. 

The structure has been refurbished with its original design with such zeal that you almost imagine Jane Austen or Lord Byron meeting over a cup of tea. The system was once a clinic, but you'd never realize it because it has elaborate cornicing, friezes, and twinkling lights, making it the least functional of all London's motels. It's so posh that donning pants would be considered impolite, so consider that while making your reservation. Here, you won't be finding the Snapchat generation—somewhat, folks nostalgic for a more specific period, one with on-the-button assistance and decent drapes.

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Hotel 41:



This historic ballroom on the fifth floor of a Regency structure made of brick-and-limestone located near St. James's Park features contemporary black-and-white décor, exquisitely carved wood, and brown leather upholstery. Get the most out of the Penhaligon's beauty goods by ordering room service underneath the Conservatory Suite's glass ceiling. Downstairs, relax by the fireplace before savouring the liquor choices in the Leopard Bar's quaint wood panelling.

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Rosewood London:



Rosewood London has successfully put Holborn back on the map for Londoners and revived the Edwardian mansion with its oh-so-stunning Mirror room. However, the entryways of this resort make it the most fun part, which both entail hopping along in a large marble court that was once utilized for horse-drawn carts, a reflection of the property's regal beginnings. The atmosphere is unrestricted for conventional taste buds: social areas are made up of granite and wood with a moderate colour scheme. The clientele is a senior, refined type with enough money to spare.

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The Montague on the Gardens:



This place is best suited for people not on a budget. If the restaurant had a concept, it would be luxurious: The rooms of the hotel are complemented by the rich silk carpets along with silky robes, while you can enjoy the beautiful views of the garden from the Cigar terrace along with experiencing the in-house maestro.

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The Standard London:



The pendulum of London's centre of gravity is now swinging to King's Cross, with fashion school Central Saint Martin’s moving in and Heatherwick Studio's Coal Drops Yard taking over a line of abandoned commercial storage rooms. The Standard hotel group built its first hotel outside of the United States in the area's red-light and lengthy history. Even though the project was completed in 2017, there was still some uncertainty when it first emerged, with its Brutalist city council structure standing amid the wheelie-suitcase craze of Euston Road.

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Treehouse London: 



Treehouse, an environmentally friendly, ecological pioneer that opened in the chilly season of 2019-20 in London to provide a more pleasant and less expensive alternative to other hotels, is owned by Barry Sternlicht. Like their corporate image, Treehouse hotels place a high value on community areas. A London hedge-fund firm that invests in restaurants, wine bars, and several other businesses is behind the opening of Treehouse. For example, Treehouse offers an exquisite view of the city centre and a luxury mansion eatery from the Los Angeles-based Madera Group, behind California's innovative Tocaya eateries serving healthy. The rooms, which are decked out with colourful children's toys and plush creatures strewn across beds and seats, offer a childlike air of sociability owing to their enormous windows that overlook some of London's most iconic attractions.

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Claridge's:



Have you ever noticed how Claridge's magnificent antique spinning doors effortlessly open without any resistance? When you arrive, they seemingly float themselves around like a soothing bath. Once you enter the Foyer and Reading Room, a swirling kaleidoscope of marble tiles and dim chandelier light greets you. 

The liveliness of the Foyer and Reading Room is immediate to your front; a faint thump of martinis being thoroughly mixed in the Fumoir and carefully shaken in the Bar may be heard to one side. A stock-still and emotionless figural configuration of spatial white demarcations surrounds the corner. Claridge's is often referred to as Art Deco.

 However, this is only a rough estimate. The majority of the structure predates the Art Deco era, and it has continued to follow it for most of its history as a hotel. It has exquisite etiquette, magnificent royal looks, an onanistic soul, and the sparkling zest of a 1920s dancer. Still, it also has more postmodern elements thanks to partnerships with artists like Thierry Despont, Diane von Furstenberg, and David Linley. The hotel's Beaux-Arts interior celebrates Art Nouveau and French design, with rooms that exude elegance. The artworks on view include sculptures by Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse and works from masters such as La Tour Eiffel Haussmann Place de l'Etoile now. 

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Sea Containers London:



Stranded on the South Bank, this hotel is a glitzy frenzy of ferrous metals. One can visit Tate Modern and The London Eye before most visitors have completed their morning tea. It is a massive copper haul designed in 19- century by Cutty Sark, the bartender of Lanes Bar and bartender Mr Ryan Chetiyawardana also known as Mr Lyan. The place looks like a rustic home.

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Generator London:



Generator Hostels have raised the Bar for inexpensive lodging. The location between the British Museum and Kings Cross is nothing like that. Internally, the pipes and raw bricks, the dancing floor, a snug lobby, a café and a bar that is so vibrant are appreciated along with the forepart of the classic red double-decker van making the place look fun and extra enjoyable than it does on the outside.

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The Dorchester:



Prince Philip's bachelorette ceremony was held at this spectacular West End institution. No wonder the promenade eatery is an exquisite spot to appreciate the handmade frames of gold

And the coral-coloured silk drapes. Spacious, cosy chambers with wide bathtubs and English country house style, with gates adorned with wildflowers and decorations, and fixtures covered with nuts and apple blossoms, are the creations of theatre designer Oliver Messel. (Wallpaper with beaded-glass elements can be seen in three top-floor suites.) The receptionists, notably, are one of the finest in the world. And whatever you choose, don't leave without having a taste of the high tea.

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Hyatt Regency London- The Churchill:



If the title didn't give it away, this Marylebone guesthouse was named after Winston Churchill. The Art Deco Churchill Bar & Terrace is adorned with heavy history textbooks selected by London's famed Daunts Books and love notes received between Churchill and his spouse Catherine. At the same time, the on-site eatery Montagu is influenced by his dining area.

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One Aldwych:



Fresh fruit and bouquets are restocked daily in every bedroom at this fancy hotel, as is the charming sack they give for guests the day of check-out in case they wish to take the restroom items. The hotel's massive subterranean pool is fantastic, room service focuses on healthier alternatives, and the on-site eatery Indigo serves local, gluten- and dairy-free cuisine.

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The Savoy:



This is one of the most well-known hotels in London. The Savoy was the first England resort to have stairs and lightbulbs, and it is still at the top of the heap after a beautiful makeover amid London's COVID-19 shutdown. It is a place that was often visited and appreciated by Marilyn Monroe and Marlene Dietrich (for Savoy being their favourite, a suite was dedicated to them). As you walk through the doorkeepers' flat caps and skirts and into the magnificent, wood-panelled industry's checkerboard floor, you're sure to get a tingle of anticipation. The guest rooms are spacious and opulent, with classical décor including environmental watercolours in gold leaf frames. Savoy's floor-to-ceiling balconies offer extraordinary views of the Thames and south London.

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Four Seasons Hotel London at Park Lane:



The Four Seasons Hotel London at Park Lane has always been about its extraordinary views to be appreciated through the bright accommodations, its rooftop Jacuzzi and the eating patios are all surrounded by the best green spaces and commercial streets of London. The guest bedrooms are warm and comforting, with sycamore panelling on golden panels, comfy seating areas, heaters, outside patios, and colourful artwork. The Hyde Park Suite, for example, was created exclusively for guests who want to see the views from the ninth level. Visitors can enjoy delicious contemporary meals, seasonal drinks, and high tea at any of the resort's several eating facilities, in addition to 24-hour customer services.

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The MileStone Hotel:



This 19th-century Victorian hotel, situated just off Hyde Park and next to the Kensington Palace, finds joy in its 2:1 employee to guest proportion. Maintenance done twice a day, along with the bag of sweets delivered each time, includes butter chocolate, chocolate spins and the world-famous Turkish delight—and a waiter serves visitors a glass of wine upon entry. At the Stables Bar, there are embroidered sofas and equestrian paintings. Penhaligon's toiletries are available in specialized bedrooms such as The Meghan Suite (named after the Duchess of Sussex), the Italian Suite, the Renaissance Suite, and the Lotus.

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Chiltern Firehouse:



The architecture, a frilly, flaming redbrick old fire station amid famous Marylebone High Street and Baker Street, lives up to its name: the most pop star-based hotel in London. The 24 guestrooms have an old British splendour, comfy-luxurious mattresses with beddings that are custom made, fireplaces to keep you cosy and warm bathroom floors, except for two bedrooms. The eatery holds back seats for hotel employees, generally reserved months ahead of time.

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The Bloomsbury:



The Bloomsbury Hotel is in the heart of London, but it somehow feels a little bit hidden. The Central Club of the Young Women's Christian Union was previously housed in this exquisite redbrick Edwin Lutyens-designed structure. It has undergone various restorations since being redesigned as a hotel in the mid-1980s; Martin Brudnizki completed the most current. The decor is a fantastic mix of outrageous elements like Art Deco curves, luxurious velvet couches, ornate wallpapers, and intellectual aspects like the well-stocked bookstore, which pays homage to the city's cultural legacy.

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Conclusion:

Thus, we have brought you a guide to the best hotels you can choose from while deciding where to stay in London. The list is made depending on the location, budget likes and dislikes. I hope this gives you a better understanding. 

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